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Monday, November 12, 2018

Are You Struggling With Your Weight Loss Goals


Weight loss is a common problem millions of Americans today struggle with. Very few Americans have been successful at losing a desired amount of weight.

The main problem is that most cannot stick to the designated program. For instance, a general weight loss program includes both diet as well as exercise. Most of the time an individual trying to lose weight will at least attempt one of these. Often times what happens is that the exercise may be too strenuous for that person since they have lacked exercise for so long, which is why they are in such shape.

Another perspective is the diet. Most people looking to lose weight are usually in this pandemic because of eating not only food with high amounts of sugars and fats, but also food in high quantities of these fats and sugars. This becomes a significant problem because changing old habits for anyone is such a difficult process especially here in the US since you can't walk two feet out your door without seeing a McDonald's.

So in the end dieting or weight loss in general is such a difficult process because of the extreme new way of life you would have to adapt to. A recent statistic said that of those who fail to reach an ideal weight goal in a diet actually gain more weight trying the diet rather then losing.

 The reason for this is once you give in, you start binge eating, meaning you eat almost everything in site with no restrictions. This is one negative impact of dieting viewed by many. Of course most researchers/doctors say diet and exercise are essential for a healthy life, whether losing weight or not.

To see the recent government released new physical fitness guidelines Click NOW.

Written by,

Dwight Obey, AdvoCare Independent Distributor

Monday, November 5, 2018

How To Beat The Holiday Cravings


Most of us are just regular people. In other words, we don't eat the perfect diet all the time and have our struggles with food, same as everyone else. But having an awareness of this fact and knowing a little bit about our health and food nutrition can help when it comes to making wise decisions, especially during the holiday season.

Many people struggle with the holiday cravings. Studies tell us that it's fairly common for food cravings to happen at certain times, quite often at around bedtime. Your guard may be down, you may have had an unusually hard day, and off you go on your not-so-merry way to find that tasty treat. 

Fatigue and stress often combine to take their toll on the best of intentions. When food cravings are unconstrained, what starts out as a bedtime snack quickly turns into a full blown feeding frenzy...not something most of us fully understand or appreciate. We head to kitchen and every other place where food can hide, clearing a path as we go. 

Most food cravings are not about satisfying a nutritional need or imbalance. They seem to be more emotionally related, or God forbid, are caused by plain old gluttony. Exactly why we over-indulge is not completely understood, however our knowledge about this subject continues to grow. 

Listed below are some my thoughts and ideas about food cravings: 

  • If the food isn't available, you can't eat it! Empty the cookie jar and keep it that way! Keep healthy food choices on-hand. 
  • Recognize the feelings and emotions that lead-up to a food craving. Do you have food cravings when you're bored, lonely, or stressed? If you can identify a trigger, you can deal with the emotion that's making you desire a certain food. Try to deal with the triggers in the best way you can. 
  •  Sometimes, even recognizing that a craving is about to happen doesn't seem to help. Don't beat yourself-up. There is always tomorrow. Call a friend, make good use of your support network and share your feelings with someone. 
  • Get enough sleep. When you're tired, you're more likely to crave things. 
  • Never give-up. When you "slip", press-in, bear-down, get a grip, do whatever is necessary to re-gain control. Try to practice restraint most of the time, but don't get legalistic and un-balanced in your weight loss approach. Think moderation and not abstinence at all times! 
  • Understand that self-control and discipline by themselves, won't cut it! If you depend totally on yourself for control, you will fail. Forming caring and supportive relationships is required. If you do not currently have a support network, start building one TODAY.  Better yet, announce it on Facebook, trust me this will surely hold you accountable, because as we know, there will be those who are there to see you fall off...Prove them wrong!
  • Exercise. It increases feel-good endorphins that cut down on your cravings. Try to get at least 30 minutes of physical activity every day. 
  • Use moderation. Instead of stuffing yourself with every kind of food hoping that your craving will go away, eat 100 to 200 calories of your "craved" food. 
  • Substitute with low-fat foods and complex carbs. If you're hungry for chocolate, eat non-fat chocolate yogurt. Try fig bars or raisins for a sweet craving. 
  • Never skip a meal. Eat every three to five hours. Try six smaller meals or regular meals with nutritious snacks. 
  • Understand that hunger craving are often times stress related. Practice other ways to treat chronic stress, such as a walk in the park, spiritual connections, a cozy fireplace, baths...all these stimulate neurochemicals that activate regions of the brain that stimulate pleasure. Relaxation techniques may work by reducing the psychological drives on stress output, which can be the root causes of stress. Bottom line, substitute pleasurable experiences for comfort foods. 
  • Beware of certain medications. They can stimulate appetite. Drugs used for the treatment of depression and bipolar disorder can be appetite stimulants. Other drugs, both prescription and over the counter, may influence appetite as well. If you are on a medication, and troubled by food cravings, discuss this with your doctor or pharmacist. You may be able to find an alternative that doesn't send your cravings out of control. 
  • Distract Yourself. What's that old expression...idle hands are the devils workshop? Get busy. Do anything other than cave-in to your desire for food, and keep doing it until the cravings subside. 
  • One final thought, take a look inside your refrigerator and kitchen cabinets and do some general "house cleaning." Throw-out all that unhealthy stuff that is waiting to sabotage your diet, and start shopping more wisely. A little forethought and careful planning will go a long way for improving your chances of success. 

Before the Holidays, I like to use AdvoCare Slim, a Vitamin, Mineral, & Herbal Supplement which helps control my appetite, and enhances my energy.

Eat wisely, be happy, and beat this years holiday cravings! 

Written by,

Dwight Obey, AdvoCare Independent Distributor

This article is intended to be used for informational purposes only. It is not to be used in place of, or in conjunction with, professional medical advice or any doctors recommendation. Prior to beginning any weight loss program, individuals must consult a physician for proper diagnosis and/or treatment.